Tutwiler News

TUTWILER NEWS


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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

Where have all the sidewalks gone?

    It's been many years ago now since I came to Tutwiler to live (in town, that is) and one of the things I remember so well were the sidewalks where we could walk most everywhere without ever having to get in the street. Of course, being built that long ago, they do not now cover the whole town but I've noticed that some of those we do have have been allowed to become overgrown, so it just looks like the rest of the grass in the yard. Some of them have bucked up from root growth and some haved caved in, but for the most part they're still there. Wouldn't it be great to have them visible again! So my plea is, to those of you who have a sidewalk in your yard, to focus on cleaning the grass from it so it'll show as it was meant to and will look neat besides. Just one of those civic things, you know. Thanks!
    We're getting awfully dry around here. The crops are looking good for the most part and mainly due to irrigation while a few places, especially those fields planted late, are burning up. Makes me think of politics...there are so many people running for office, many are going to end up "dry". Who to vote for? So many we've not even heard of. Tuesday is the day, so we'll see you at the Polls.
    A missionary ball team from Athens, Alabama came our way, making ther headquarters (eating and sleeping) at Thelma Wright's in Tutwiler and Bob and Dianne Wright's in Clarksdale. They played ball and witnessed at Parchman, Greenwood and Holly Springs. They had a wonderful time at the Wright's.
    Congratulations to Panny Mayfield for her Show of Photographs at Cottonlandia in Greenwood recently. We were unable to attend, but from all reports, her show was enthusiastically recieved and well attended.
    Clarksdale High School's 1979 graduating class, of which Cristen Barnard was a member, held it's 20th reunion at Hopson recently. The meal recieved raves and that's because it was catered by our own Anne Barnes and her daughter, Joy Belipanni of Belzoni.
    About 21 of 57 members and spouses of the 1959 graduating class of West Tallahatchie High School met at the Bridgewater Inn in Greenwood for their 40th reunion. Some of those in attendance who still live close by are Bettye Sue Coleman, Meadie Williams, Hilda Strom, Frances Glover, Cebe Pharis, Fred Lane, Frances Foti, Charles Houston, Dan Ellison, Jerry Beck, James Biggers, Tommy Henderson, Joe Buddy Moore and Nancy Shaw Rideout. Teachers even came and they were Coach and Katie Cox and Lamar and Barbara Leggett.
    Dusty and Gina Pearson's family dedication of infant son, Joseph, was an inspiring event held last Sunday at First Baptist Church and was attended by family members Jesse and Holli, Joseph's brother and sister, his grandfather Jenkins of Indianola, grandmother Fredna Pearson, great grandmother Naida Pearson and his aunt, Dawn Pearson, all of Tutwiler.
    David Ware is returning home to Georgia after several months stay with his sister Glenda Gee and her family in Tutwiler.
    Sympathy is extended to Mable Callicutt whose nephew, Charles David Ashford of California, died this past week.
    Lil Brewer of Sikston, Ms. (formerly of Webb) was the guest of Wilma Dyess this past week and, of course, visited her son Bruce and his family in Clarksdale.
    More "All Stars" and their coaches from our area include Allen Clark, Adam Clark, Jonathan Clark, Dhane Burton, Roy Newton and Joey Russell. Congratulations, fellas!
    While in Greenwood for yet another eye consultation for Carroll, we stopped by "Ole McDonald's" for refreshments and found beautiful little Corrine Vance with her mom, Madge, having the same idea. Corrine had just finished her riding lesson with Jan Sturdivant and was very exuberant about it.
    Our visitors over the past couple of weeks (besides political candidates) include our son, Cally, with his friend, Gerry, of Red Bay, Ala; James and Marilyn Bruister of Tylertown and June Hennington and two of her daughters, Marilyn and Lucy, from Crystal Springs, Jackson and Ridgeland. Another visitor was by phone, from Chicago even. It was my friend, Byrd Dantzler, and he was upset with me (and for very good reason). I forgot his birthday and it was his 99th! Next year will be the biggie...calls for a celebration!
    That's about it, again, from Tutwiler where, believe it or not, wild hog hunting is becoming a new sport.


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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

    It's back to school again already, for some anyway, and summer's not even over yet. Soft ball has been a big thing for so many, both boys and girls, including some more I haven't mentioned like Julye Clark, Melinda Brett and Corley Luckett. My sweetie next door, Sara Dunavent, is out every day practicing with her dad, keeping in readiness. Chance and Blake Smith along with their dad, Ronnie, have added canoing to their summer activities, competing in races in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas. They've won some of those races, too! Many of our young people attended Camp Lakeside this summer, contributing to the 300+ in attendance over a five week period. Among those were three of Shirley Brougher's grandaughters from Brandon.
    Others have been doing some serious studying like Melissa Goss Griffin of Webb and Pam Pugh Moore of Sumner who tied for highest honors in a class of 24 nursing students graduating from Holmes Community College at Grenada. We congratulate them on their achievements.
    Carroll is scheduled to teach another class in Saddle Repair at Northwest beginning in September. The class he taught last fall went well and he was asked to do it again this year which makes him happy since he enjoys it so much and has always wanted to pass on this art form to others. He has always loved horses and anything pertaining to them, so saddle making has been a natural. Up until a few years ago we had horses and rode quite a bit, including participating in horse shows and belonging to the Saddle Club. In fact, our local club arena was on our place where we met regularly and held competitions, where other riders came from all over. It was great fun and we "lived and breathed" horses all the time. One of the stories told on Carroll during that time (the seventies) was him running into a young lady in Clarksdale one day, who also showed horses. She had her little pet dog on a leash and, as they stood there on the street corner talking, the little dog sidled up to Carroll's leg and he jumped backwards. The lady said, "Oh, you don't have to worry about him, he won't bite you." Carroll said, "I know, but there for a minute I thought he was going to kick me!"
    Joy Sossaman and son, Ruston, have returned from several days in Destin, Florida where they were joined by her sister Diane Smith and son, Reeves and his friend of Cleveland for some R&R before the busy fall season begins.
    Opal Graves of Meadville recently spent a couple of days with Earline Burton. She accompianied her son Hal to Clarksdale where Hal, along with other Independant Insurance Angencies sponsored college boys in a golf tournament at the county club. Earline met them there and enjoyed a nice visit while having lunch. During Opal's brief stay, they enjoyed a visit with H.O. Pullen and family, Billy H. Pullen of Clarksdale and Rodney Burton and family of Tutwiler. They also wedged in a short trip to Woods Bros. Pottery in Merigold.
    Sympathy is extended to Shirley Brougher in the death of her brother-in-law, Alva Burton Angelin of Memphis. Also Grady Smith who is Nina Jennings Smith's father-in-law, died. Tom and Polly Jennings, along with Marjorie Cox of Clarksdale, attended his funeral in Wesson. Our condolences to them as well as to Kae King whose sweet great grandmother died this past week. I need to correct the name of Mable Callicutt's nephew reported last time. It should have been James David Ashford. Sorry about that.
    The sick include Duke Haney of Rome who is hospitalized in Memphis; Larry McCluney of Webb who had surgery in Grenada; Billy Benson of Webb who had surgery in Greenwood; Bobbie Clark of Sumner who is hospitalized in Clarksdale and my neighbor, Annette Brand, is home from Baptist East in Memphis, I'm happy to report.
    That's about it, again, from Tutwiler where we had a pretty good turnout for the elections. Our Supervisor Jerome Little was re-elected. He, along with an article in the Clarion Ledger, informed us last summer that money had been allocated for our road (Bruister Road) to be paved. We are still waiting!


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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

    Wonderful rain came this week! Although too late to benefit the crops, it has already perked up the flowers in the yard. Along with the rain came lightning, very loudly announcing itself as it struck a tree next door in the Brand's yard and zapped our computer as well. Melanie and Sebe feel about that computer like I do about the dishwasher. It's almost painful to be without.
    Reunions continue to be popular as the summer goes on. The Fullilove/Lane family members gathered at the Club House for theirs with some fifty in attendance. Leona and Johnie's children were here days in advance waiting, with Pattie and her family coming from St. Joe, La.; Mike from North Port, Ala.; Johnie, Jr.from Baton Rouge and Linda and her family from Mobil. Some of Leona's family who didn't make it for the reunion came later in the week and visited so the Lane's had a houseful for many days.
    The 1969 West Tallahatchie graduating class held it's 30 year reunion last Saturday night at Hopson's with graduates from 1968 and 1970 coming, too. Delanne Bruister Billingsly spearheaded this event which turned into quite a party with a larger number in attendance. I have been unable to touch base with her since to get more particulars, but, since I ran in with a bucket of flowers just as they began to gather that night, I can name a few who were there. Like Margaret Harris Dyess, Jane Jernberg, Ed Stillions, Rocky Lindsey and his family from Springdale, Ark. and Mike and Cindy Ellis. Mike was "striking up the band" so I know the music was good. Greek and Donna Weatherall Rice came from Houston, texas and were overnight guests of Will McMullen. They came from near and far for a "wonderful" time of celebration. Of course Delanne was there with husband Bobby from Como and was thrilled with the turnout. This came on the heels of their co-hosting a birthday celebration for Delanne's mom, Daysidel Bruister-Berryhill, the weekend before. James, Marilyn and Braseye Bruister came from Tylertown and, along with Jimbo, Barbara, Caleb, Shannon and Sara Dunavent, co-hosted the supper party. All her family and friends in the pecan grove enjoyed it along with other friends and family members.
    Among recent visitors in the home of Earline Burton were Murle Parkinson of Jackson and Linda Stillions Smith and son, Hunter, of Auburn, Alabama. Arriving on Wednesday, Linda and Hunter left Friday morning for Oklahoma City to attend the wedding of her daughter, Rebecca, returning to Tutwiler on Sunday before leaving for home on Monday. In between her guests and their travels, Earline accompanied her nieces Ann and Jennifer King to Greenwood on Saturday where they attended the lovely wedding of Earline's greatniece, Kristen Lewis Smith, to Chad Mattox and then on to the beautiful garden reception at the home of Mrs. James Howard Lewis, grandmother of the bride.
    Anne Barnes attended her grandson's ballgame in Rayville, La. over the weekend between Humphries Academy and Rayville. Anne Starr has returned from Springfield, Mo. where she visited with fellow needlework Guild Members and friends.
    John Moyer is being welcomed home by little son Jake, wife Sandra and a host of friends after spending several weeks in the Mojave Desert on National Guard duty.
    Nelson and Jimmie Browning have enjoyed the past week or so playing host to their little great grandaughter from Memphis.
    We had a brief but good visit with our grandson's friend, Trace Furniss, when he came by from Mississippi State the other day.
    Two of our Tutwiler people, Polly Jennings and Jean Thomas, are both home and doing better after spending several days in the hospital. Our "paper boy" Sammie Joe Spinosa of Sumner had surgery last week and is improving. In the meantime, his wife Debbie is filling in for him with the help of little son, Joseph. They get it here, though some days are skipped with two papers the next, but they're getting it done and we wish him a speedy recovery. And, I just got word of Billy Hitt Morrow of Webb falling and breaking his hip!
    Sympathy goes to the family of Mary Ann Townes of Minter City due to her death. And to Joe "Buddy" Moore and family of Winona in the death of his sister, Carolyn Moore Corley, of Deerfield, Florida. Both of these young women died of cancer. Carolyn grew up here in Tutwiler in the house where Robert and Cristen Barnard now live.
    That's about it again from Tutwiler where just down the road in Sumner Shellgo was robbed by a masked man with a gun. He was still recognized and the law was waiting for him when he arrived home a little later. Another incident in Sumner was that of attorney Alex Gates' Explorer being stolen from in front of his law office and, to make it worse, the culprit hit a bridge and wrecked it before being caught. Sounds like a moral to these stories somewhere but I haven't decided on it just yet.
    Oh, yes! Let me tell you where you can get a super delicious hamburger. Of course, you need to be close by Holly Springs or deliberately plan your travels that way, which is what we did on our way home from Southaven last week. We read about Phillip's Grocery, where USA Today hailed their burger as one of the top three "Perfect Burgers" in the nation, in a little book by Lorraine Redd, a Mississippian, titled "Only In Mississipi". It truly is a good burger.


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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

    It is early morning as I write this column and already I've been outside where the change is so pleasant and refreshing I just have to comment on it. All the sounds of Fall are there, rustling leaves, a soft breeze, the whole nine yards. Wouldn't it be wonderful if this was the high temperature year 'round! Of course, I'm thinking only from the comfort standpoint when I say that, knowing it takes hotter days to produce the crops we grow here in the Delta. Yet, it remains a most pleasant thought, one that almost becomes a wish.
    Labor Day brought many families together. Thelma Wright's house was filled to the rafters with her children Fernie and Barbara Wood and their three daughters and husbands/fiances and one son from Alabama; Bob and Diane Wright with sons Brandon, Chris and Jason from Clarksdale and Diane's parents from Memphis. They filled two whole pews at church Sunday morning.
    Robert Kellum, son of Danny and Deena Kellum, visited his grandmother, Savanah, over the holiday.
    We took a little trip on Monday, traveling about 200 miles. We set the cruise on 55 and everybody passed us! I mean everybody. In fact, before we'd gotten five miles away from home, we had a near miss of being right in the middle of what could have been a tragedy. There was a steady stream of traffic, both ways, and yet two cars following us decided to pass. The first one barely had room, but the second one didn't. We braked and the oncoming car took the ditch avoiding a head-on collision. We breathed a prayerful sigh of gratitude and continued on for the rest of the journey with nothing more than being overtaken and passed by all traveling our way. It seemed to us that 55 was just too slow for those making their own rules for the road. Nevertheless, the state got by with a low number of fatalities for the holiday. Of course, we don't know the number of non-fatal, misery-filled accidents, many of which might have been prevented had the speed limit been honored. We recieved a note from Claude Johnson this week. He now resides at Riggs Manor in Raymond where he is doing well and enjoying the "goings on" there.
    Adelaide Steele, with the help of her nurse Ms. Baine, entertained a large crowd of ladies in her home with a lovely afternoon Tea on Thursday.
    Sunday morning during the worship hour at First Baptist, Joel Hays was presented with a 5 year perfect attendance pin by Carroll Bruister, who is the incoming Sunday School Director. What an achievement! We congratulate you, Joel, for setting an example of a seemingly outgoing trend, but one that remains as important as it ever was. Joel was promoted to the Youth Department on Sunday.
    Congratulatins, too, to Tommy Callicutt, son of Thomas and Jean for his appointment as Chief Financial Officer of Whitney Holding Corporation and Whitney National Bank in New Orleans.
    Hooray for this household, there are clothes in the washer! Carroll told me at breakfast this morning he was wearing his cleanest pair of dirty socks which is his way of saying,"I'm running out of clean clothes!" There are seven loads underway right now (does that seem like a lot for 4 people?) and the washing machine is fighting back. It spews green stuff on the clothes that won't wash out. Years ago, before our dryer became a staple, I wrote this little poem about wash day--
Considering all the clothes on the line
I can't quite determine
If we're clean as sunshine
Or filthy as vermin.

    Last Sunday at the evening worship hour at First Baptist, Anna Hays and her mother Rose presented an inspiring mini concert of vocals and instrumentals. Anna, although in grade school, attended a music workshop at Blue Mountain this summer. Anna's brother Joel recited by memory from the Psalms and her dad is the Rev. J.B.Hays, pastor of First Baptist, Tutwiler.
    The community sick consist of James Walters of Webb who had surgery in the Tupelo hospital where his son-in-law, Dr. Rish, is on staff, and Billy Hitt Morrow is in rehab at Baptist Hospital in Memphis after breaking his hip from a fall at home.
    Martha Turner Gwin who we know as "Jib" is moving back to her home place a few miles out from Tutwiler, along with two of her daughters who are retiring and returning also. Beth Christensen is retiring after teaching for 43 years in De Moines, Iowa and Dorothy Bingham of Anniston, Ala. is retiring from the Automobile Tire buiness that she and her son own. They, along with their mother, Jib, who has been living in a retirement home in De Moines, spend their vacations together each year and it's been their dream to retire and return to their home place in Tutwiler. They will arrive on Sept. 18th and be with Evelyn Turner while Melvin Bullen (another sibling and Banker in Charlotte, N.C.) sees to the house renovations before their cousin, Dollye Turner Massey, an interior decorator in Memphis, comes to do her part. Other Turner relatives close by are Sonny and Nancy and, across the highway, Pelham and Teeny at Tara. Jib, Beth and Dorothy are all talented artists in varying fields and we join them in their excitement and enthusiasm in returning.
    That's about it, again, from Tutwiler where Sunday is Grandparents Day. Not only in Tutwiler, but everywhere! So, go visit a grandparent...if not yours, then somebody else's. The nursing homes are full of them!!


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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

    Can this really be September? The gins are ginning and the pickers are picking so harvesting is well under way with many of the surrounding fields beautifully white and waiting. The wonderful fall weather is invigorating for whatever task is at hand.
    James and Annette Brand's guests this week are Sam and Jan Staman of Loudonville, Ohio who are enjoying seeing cotton and it being picked and ginned for the first time. Sam and James were in the Army together in Italy, including Anzio Beachhead, through France, Germany and into Austria at wars end. They served with the 3rd Infantry Division from 1943 through 1945, entering fresh out of high school and being sent immediately into bitter combat. They have exchaged Christmas cards and visited by phone, but had not seen each other since 1945. It's been a great time for them this week and for Annette and Jan getting to know each other as well.
    What could be better during weather like this than attending football games? That's just what about fifteen Baptist youth did last weekend when Ronnie Smith and Bob Ed Wright took them to Mississippi State on the 18th.
    On that same date Jib Turner Gwin and her children came together again here at their old home place where Jib and two of her daughters will once again make their home. All her children were here, so they enjoyed being together for the first time in years. Lydia came from California, Melvin from North Carolina, Dorothy from Alabama and Beth and Jib from Iowa. Dorothy's son came and some friends also to help them get moved and settled in. Their aunt, Evelyn Turner, played host with wonderful meals for them during this time. These ladies are enthusiastic and ready to become involved in our activities and we welcome them. All three were at "Sandwich With Books" on Wednesday where we enjoy food for the mind as well as the body. Black Notice by Patricia Cornwell, Travels With Charley by John Steinbeck, and Front Porch Tales by Phillip Gulley were reviewed by yours truly. Also attending for the first time was Suzanne Powers, and out-of-towners were Mayor Elsie Hanks of Webb and Bro. Truman Scarborough of Charleston. Angela Etheridge, County Librarian, was scheduled to be there but had a conflict.
    Tuesday's TNT Luncheon group enjoyed Maxine Jennings sharing pointers on handmaking ceramics. Maxine has a shop in Webb which houses over 1800 different molds, where you can attend classes or just purchase greenware and work on them there. The pieces she brought to show made you want to get busy on something of your very own or to make especially for someone else.
    Adelaide Steele enjoyed having her daughter, Aide Whitaker of Tallahassee, this past week. She was favored with a visit from Fayette Junkin of Wichita, Kansas as well. Fayette visited her Bruister relatives while in town also. Rose Hays has returned from Cottonplant, Ms. where she visited her father over the weekend.
    Congratulations to Steve and Tanya Card Smith of Sumner who have a new baby girl. She is being welcomed by big sister Cody.
    Patsy and Jim Hamilton hosted her niece's wedding reception in their home last Saturday. The rooms were beautifully decorated in a way that was reminiscent of family gatherings and "doings" when Jim's grandparents lived there.
    Dolly Parton, via Barbara Jennings, enlivened the NARFE meeting we hosted in our home Friday with county-wide members present. Mary Harpole of Charleston is President.
    The area sick are Ruby Beaird who is in rehab in Memphis after breaking her leg in 2 places; Marianne Whitten of Sumner in Baptist Central; Marge Bright of Sumner in Clarksdale Medical Center and Wilma Prine of Sumner, home now after surgery. Wilma's mother, Pauline Jenkins, is very ill also.
    Sympathy goes to Earline Burton and H.O.Pullen in the death of their sister, Ivadell Pullen Smith of Greenwood. My aunt, May Rodgers (who was a Tubbs) of Water Valley, died this week after spending several years in the nursing home there. I've just recieved word that Bobbie Clark of Sumner has died. She has been critically ill with cancer for the past few months. We sympathize with her family.
    That's about it again from Tutwiler where there's always "news", some good, some not so good and some unprintable.


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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

    The week of my last article was probably the busiest one we've had in a while. It was some meeting or function every day with our participation either away from home or here at our house. As I prepared for our guests on Friday, I looked forward to having a few leisure hours afterward before the usual activity on Saturday and Sunday. Those plans were soon changed when my sister Yvonne, who lives near Springfield, Tennessee, called to tell me we would be having company later that day. "They were leaving her house at noon and would arrive here (probably) around seven," she said. "They" meant my aunt Edna Crow and her daughter Alice Fricke, both of Staunton, Virginia and their friend, Eugenia Ray of Johnson City, Tennessee. All three are deaf. None of us know sign language.
    Aunt Edna is the wife of my daddy's only brother who was born deaf with one other deaf sibling and two hearing ones, one of them being my dad. Since their parents were both deaf, my dad learned to sign before learning to speak so through the years when these relatives would visit he was our interpreter. It was not until after his death that I realized what an opportunity I had missed by not getting him to teach me. It will always be one of my big regrets.
    Although my uncle was deaf, he taught for 50 years in the Little Rock School for the Deaf. He was a Boy Scout Leader all his adult life, being awarded the Silver Beaver and the Good Shepherd awards. He was a Lay Minister and interpreter in Baptist churches in Little Rock. He was the epitome of kindness and goodness. His advice to their only child, Alice, was to take advantage of every opportunity that was presented to her. She did just that and, in the fifties while in high school, participated in the Olympics in Helsinki, Finland, where she placed 4th in sprinting. She was a very good (and fast) runner.
    She "sang" for the United States Senate while attending Gallidet College in Washington. Some of you Clarksdale Quota Club members helped her accomplish this because she attended college on a Quota Club scholarship. Now, after thirty years of teaching, she has retired and is caring for her semi-invalid mother (as well as having helped care for her dad before his death). She was inducted into the Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame this past year.
    Her husband Wayne, also deaf, teaches school and is one of five licensed deaf airplane pilots in the U.S.
    My aunt lost her hearing at the age of seven when she had Rheumatic Fever. Throughout her life, she could lip-read as well as talk a little. Now her vision is so poor after the stroke, she has only peripheral vision in one eye but not enough to read writing. Only enough to see signing, which is her only communication tool except to say a few words, making it a one-way conversation unless one knows signing.
    They met the friend they brought with them about five years ago and, after finding out they both had the Crow name in common, brought her back to Webb where she had lived till she was thirteen years old. She wanted to find where her grandparents and parents were buried and see where she once lived, so they brought her, combining that with visiting us along the way.
    They arrived around 8:30. How they found us, especially after dark, I'll never know, but Yvonne had drawn them a detailed map and it must have been a good one for our road does not have signs giving the name of it. We had waited on them for supper and they were ready. We did not get up from the table till eleven o'clock. We "talked" nonstop (writing volumes) and Alice would sign to the others. Never has our house been so quiet, and yet we have three notebooks filled with conversations which we've enjoyed reading again since their leaving.
    My sister Patsy, from Lambert, joined us for the day, Saturday, beginning with breakfast and going to Webb, first, where Eugenia found the house she once lived in, also the Townsends, DeLongs and couldn't decide firmly about where the Hightowers lived. That would have been Dr. and Mrs. Hightower but she got to see where his office used to be and was very disappointed about how the town was less than what she remembered it to be. She became distressed even more when viewing the Methodist Church where she was baptized and wrote me a quick note asking "but where are the beautiful windows?" The present owners have blocked off a smaller area to hold services and the windows cannot be seen from within. She audibly moaned over this. Coming home takes time and we slowly covered every street for remembrances here and there.
    At the Charleston Cemetery, we found her grandparent's headstones but she wanted more and tirelessly continued looking. I could hardly believe an 81 year old with an artificial hip was outlasting me but, then, I recalled how well she'd slept the night before while I lay there wide-eyed, wishing I could do the same. They stayed another night and we "talked" until an even later hour. They seemed to enjoy everything so much and I told Alice, "We wish we were deaf so we could have as much fun as ya'll are having." When she told the others they looked at us, beaming and throwing kisses.
    They were interested in everything, from seeing the white fields of cotton and it being picked mechanically; all the little towns and their personalities to all our activities. Endless curiosity. This particular visit erased a view we'd subconsciously held about them being handicapped. They don't recognize that word. Indeed, we wondered, in amazement, if it didn't apply more to us.
    You know, Beethoven was deaf and communication frustrated him so he did not fare well in society. The story is that when family or friends died he would walk into the home, go straight to the piano and play passionately for several minutes, then leave. The effect was better than any words had he been able to speak them.

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