Tutwiler News

TUTWILER NEWS


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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

Well, it's happened again. Another backward decision by those who are supposed to know better and are in the position to do better. By supposedly trying to free every individual from feelings of exclusion from the political community, however remote those feelings might be and by how few they are felt, the total sum of humanity, it seems, are being placed in peril of losing freedom, period.
    Doesn't it seem more than a little strange that so many of those "smart" people who can't seem to understand what's wrong when shootings occur in our schools are some of the very ones working to erase prayer and scripture from schools and school functions? I learned John 3:16 (along with other scriptures) in school and remember well the wholesome feelings I carried with me after attending our assemblies, where scripture was read representing constructive thinkng we could take with us for life and always dismissing with prayer. The "bad" things done in schools then were talking in class or throwing spitballs...maybe you had murderous thoughts now and then, but never did anybody actually do such a thing.
    All these things we hold dear were founded on our country's belief in God and the Holy Scriptures and the less we have of them, the smaller our freedoms become. Outlawing prayer and scripture is not the whole problem, but it is certainly (in my opinion) a big part. Another big part is the breakdown of the family. I remember hearing a prominent Methodist minister in the 60's say how happy he was that scripture had been outlawed in schools, for he thought children should be taught it at home and in church. I was appalled to think that any Christian could ever be glad when scripture was forbidden anywhere. All homes, even then, did not fulfill this need nor did everybody go to church and that's why having it in school was so beneficial. Where the home failed, the school came to the rescue. With all the rulings by the "Supreme" Court and the decline of the family today, what else can be the result? Let's do something to turn this trend around!
    The TNT Group at Tutwiler Baptist had Dr. Anne Brooks on program at Tuesday's luncheon meeting presenting suggestions to enhance daily life for those getting older, like a little E & A...that is Exercise for the Arthritic (which most of us have to some degree) and moderate versions for older folks. Most are already doing the Dr. Pepper exercise that Willard Scott (of TV fame) says he does...that's getting up at 12, 2 & 4 to go to the bathroom! Dr. Brooks pointed out that age is a state of mind. That's true because I know people whose bodies are nigh spent but are vitally interested in everything and vibrant in their outlook and actions.
    Bro. and Mrs. Truman Scarbrough of Grenada came to Tutwiler Baptist where he filled the pulpit to everybody's enjoyment, while pastor J.B. Hays was attending the Southern Baptist Convention. They were guests at Anne Barnes home for one of her delicious Sunday dinners.
    The Rev. John Thomas, son of Charles and Jean Thomas, who pastors a church in Cleveland, has returned from a mission trip to the Ukraine. His group spent seven days preaching, teaching and visiting with people in a town of some 10,000, located north of Odessa on the Black Sea. The needs of the people there are many, with very limited means and travel and getting outside news. He plans to return next year.
    Donna Kimzey Drake is home from Russia for health reasons. She attended the Kimzey reunion with her dad L.W. Kimzey the first week after her arrival.
    Maryanne Osbourn of Memphis and Davalene Aquilla of Miami are visiting their aunt and uncle, Mable and Hayword Callicutt and deciding what to do about their parent's home. They are daughters of the late Dave and Kathleen Jennings and are having many good remembrances as they sift through their parents home and belongings. Maryanne has been with the Internal Revenue Service some twenty years and often testifies at trials, such as the one she just completed in New Orleans, where she qualifies as an expert witness when the need arises.
    Anne Starr has returned from Shreveport where she attended a needlework seminar held at Centenary College. Nelson and Jimmy Browning spent several days in Memphis this past week with daughter Rebecca and family while he recuperates and for a change of scenery. We heard from Claude Johnson who was concerned for all of us during the prisoner's escape. He reports doing better than ever except for getting older, but he's not complaining about that.
    The Ormans, Sammy and Jerry, accompanied daughter Joy for her son Ruston's visit to the dentist in Oxford Tuesday and, while there, looked up Vivian Mullin who now lives there near her son Vince and his family. Many of you will remember Vivian and Claude and their delicious food at the long-ago Flagg Inn, located at the entrance into Tutwiler. Of course, for lunch the Ormans met their son Bruce who is the Postmaster at Oxford and then took a look at his new home under construction.
    Carroll will be exhibiting his leather work, along with a number of other craftsmen, at the Art Museum in Jackson on Saturday.
    The WTHS Class of 1960 celebrated their 40th year after graduating this past weekend with dinner Friday night in Grenada and Saturday lunch at Bayou Bend Country Club. My brother Charles Crow was a member of that class and he and wife Bettye came from Savannah, Tn. to attend and spent Saturday night with us. He enjoyed seeing many of his former classmates like Raymond Lubianni and Willard Newton. Also visiting with Willard's mom, Mrs. Newton in Webb, and later with Raymond's sister, Lee and husband Sam Carr in Tutwiler.
    That's about it, again, from Tutwiler where new Librarian Judy Fillyaw of Charleston is now coming every day except Tuesdays to Tutwiler and already has activities going on daily. Story Hour is on Wednesday at 1:00 PM. Check with her for other events she is scheduling daily. The Library has many books and is getting new ones often, so come and give it your support. Summer is good reading time.

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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

    Lambert High School is having another Reunion, this time on Saturday the 8th. Every time I've gotten an invitation there's been a conflict, and the same is true for this one. Even though it's been fifty or more years since I attended Lambert High School, it would be nice visiting again. It sounds like a fun day, starting with gathering at Haynes Lodge where Barbara and Buddy have Lambert memorabilia in abundance, even a "Lambert School Room". Later will be pictures, program and dinner at Wilson Lake Country Club. Sorry we're having to miss it.
    Last time I talked about the 1960 WTHS Class Reunion and failed to mention that Betty Hall and Buddy Atkinson, both Tutwiler residents back then, were also in attendance.
    The Fourth had many going elsewhere but, judging from cars parked in driveways, many families celebrated here, too. Johnie Lane, Jr. of Baton Rouge extended his visit into this week with his parents, Johnie and Leona Lane. Cebe and Linda Pharis had their children home over the weekend: Ronnie and Rhonda Hall and son Pharis of Bainbridge, Georgia and Margaret Terney and son Monty of Clarksdale. Stephanie and baby daughter visited her grandfather L.W. Kimzey and her mother Donna Drake. Donna will be home from Russia for at least a year since half that time will be spent taking radiaton treatments and then the rest recovering. She is onleave from her place of service with Crusade For Christ.
    There was an interesting news item over the Fourth holiday that caught my attention. A copy of the Declaration of Independance was sold at auction for a fraction over 8 million dollars! This is one of those beyond belief things to me. There's a TV program by that name that has truly unbelievable stuff on it. This pretty much falls into that catagory. Nobody values or appreciates our independance more than I, but isn't that a little much even if one can afford it? Then, on the other hand, who can really put a price on it, for it's truly priceless.
    John and Marianne Whitten of Sumner will be remembered with a Golf Center on the Ole Miss campus, named for them and their 1 million dollar contribution for athletics programs. Both are alumni of the University of Mississippi and met there. Congratulations to Ole Miss and the Whittens.
    On Sunday July 2nd, Barbara Jennings entertained beautifully in her home with a luncheon complimenting Lesley Foster, bride-elect of Timothy Smith and Shelley Foster, bride-elect of Jerry Sheppard. Present, besides the honored couples, were Mark and Karla Foster, Jim and Patsy Hamilton, Luanne and Laura Vance. Barbara was assisted by Anne Barnes.
    Caitlin and Ryan Johnson of Houston, Texas have been visiting their grandparents, James and Annette Brand. Ryan returned home after a short visit and Caitlin will remain for the summer. Caitlin has been attending Camp Lakeside and serving as Counselor for her group. Shannon Dunavent has been doing the same thing.
    Herbert Wood of Rome had surgery this past week and we wish him a complete recovery. Alice Ann Jennings lost her battle with cancer this past week and was laid to rest in Charleston where her husband Billy, who preceded her in death, is buried. They were members of the group of young couples living in Tutwiler when Carroll and I married. Our sympathy goes to her family.
    Our grandaughters, Shelley Bruister and Keryn Page of Starkville, came for an overnight visit. Of course, Keryn brought her little one, Rhiannon, who is now six months old and has a little personality all her own. Also, of course, she's beautiful and smart! The girls made me feel great about my cooking, making me believe it was the best food they ever tasted. I don't do as much cooking as I once did but, of course, we had their favorite dishes.
    Nobody comes around selling blackberries or dewberries anymore like they did in years past. In fact, there were people living on Carroll's mail route who would usually have some. He's been retired since '82 but it's been longer than that since anybody's come around. Maybe there are not many places left where they grow like they did long ago.
    When I was around nine or ten years old several of us children went berry picking. It was hot, terribly hot, and we had walked what seemed like a long way to me and hadn't found many berries, only enough to eat as we walked. Besides that, I was wearing an old pair of somebody else's boots and they hurt my feet, which I told everybody quite often. After walking a long time and not having many berries (in our baskets), I was ready to go home and said for probably the hundredth time, "My feet hurt, let's go home". It was about then that the oldest one in the group said, "I think we're lost!" To this day, I don't know if we were really lost or if he was just smart enough to divert my attention. Believe me, my feet never crossed my mind again while trying to find the way home. When we did get there our buckets were pretty full after all. Besides, who can eat when they're frightened?
    That's about it, again, from Tutwiler where everything's doing well except tomatoes. Haven't heard of anybody having luck with them so far this year. (It could be a well-kept secret with none to share.) Our vines were looking good until, one day, they looked like they'd had boiling water poured on them. Our total crop is 1 tomato and it's about the size of a quarter and already getting red...won't be big enough to taste.

    
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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

    Rarely do I go to my vegetable and fruit garden without running into friends and acquaintances. Just the other day Jack and Marguerite Webb of Sumner were there. Don't know about them, but I was wanting some good ole home grown tomatoes. The ones I found must have been "home grown" in Siberia. I've since bought some Alabama tomatoes from Deward Tubbs of Webb that tasted right...delicious, in fact! The garden I call mine is probably yours too...Krogers on State Street in Clarksdale. Jack had not been home many days from the hospital in Greenwood where he had been confined for several days with heart problems, but was improving and doing well. Exchanged pleasantries with Judith Mitchener as she consulted her list and had a brief but good visit with Helen Tubbs Rankin, who is home with her mother, Mrs. Lorean Weeks in Sumner.
    Others ailing in our Tutrovansum area are Nelson Browning, hospitalized in Greenwood; Ada Guest, now home from the Clarksdale hospital where she had surgery on the 14th; Sammy Gee in Baptist Central, Memphis; Willie Berry in Greenwood and James Brand who says, "It's not good to tangle with a Brown Recluse." He was bitten by one and is being treated at home. Jacqueline Reeves, former Tutwiler resident, died in the ICU at Baptist East in Memphis this week. She had just transferred there from Greenwood where she had been hospitalized since before Easter. She had been transferred to Jackson once during that time, then back to Greenwood before being moved to Memphis. Her daughter Margaret Anne Bishop of Clarksdale had sounded optimistic over the move to Memphis but, due to complications, her survival was not meant to be. Our sympathy goes to her family.
    Sam and Jerry Orman accompanied his sister, Vera Jo Bryant of Ruleville, to Jackson where she was hospitalized for tests. After an overnight stay and positive results for Vera Jo, they took her home and went onto Cleveland to visit with their children, Dr. Hugh and Diane Smith and son Reeves, upon their return from several weeks in Africa.
    Adelaide Steele returned home Tuesday after seeing her doctor in Memphis. We've missed her at several functions lately and hope she'll be feeling better soon. I need to make a couple of corrections from last time. Alice Anne Jennings was buried in Tippo. The services were held in Charleston. The other one was Mrs. Herbert Wood (L'Dean) who had surgery and not her husband. Sorry about that.
    Got an update on Nelson Browning. Carroll had an appointment at Coleman Eye Clinic Thursday, resulting in some adjustments having to be made with his glasses and,as they wouldn't be ready for a couple of hours, we went to the hospital only to find Nelson had been dismissed. Of course, we were happy for him and even happier because the candy we were taking him was our favorite. We certainly didn't want the heat to get it!
    Barbara Jennings with daughter Luanne Vance and grandaughters Laura Vance, Elizabeth Jennings and Meg Farrish are enjoying a few days together on the coast this week. Barbara had twenty five for Sunday dinner and served as one of the hostesses for a bridal shower that afternoon, so she was ready for a holiday. Also, Joe Buddy and Margaret Moore of Winona stopped by to visit Barbara and family, arriving after lunch time. Joe Buddy, whose mother was Louise Jennings Moore, grew up in Tutwiler and is now serving his second term as Superintendent of Education in Winona.
    T.A. Jennings and Jeffrey Clark were accompanied by their parents, Meg and Jeff Clark, to Hattiesburg this week for the All Star Playoffs. We wish them success.
    Mileah Jennings is on her annual summer visit with relatives in Florida for several weeks.
    On Sunday afternoon, July 16th, a bridal shower complimenting Helen Womble, bride elect of Jason Wright, was held in the Everett Fellowship Hall of Tutwiler Baptist Church with a lively crowd present. Some of those from Charleston were Nita Musslewhite, Elizabeth Dickey, Joanne Young and her pretty daughter, Gody. The honoree was radiant in a frock of varying shades of lavender, her favorite color. She received many useful and lovely gifts. Hostesses were Savannah Kellum, Agnes Martindale, Vergie Grissom, Leona Lane, Mable Callicutt, Barbara Jennings, Jerry Orman and myself.
    On Tuesday the TNT Group were entertained by the Rev. John Thomas, son of Charles and Jean Thomas, who shared hilights of his Missionary trip to the Ukraine. It was informative and uplifting.
    Trees are like all other living things, I guess. They die, too. Three big,old, old Oak trees on the Youth Center yard (formerly Tutwiler Elementary School grounds) had to be cut down because they had decayed and were falling and dangerous. Rosemound Cemetery had the same problem. The truth is, the felled trees create a void and will be missed as surely as any other living thing.
    We enjoyed a quick visit to Red Bay,Alabama to see our son Cally and his family, then on to Athens for a Leather Expo last week. Cally had just returned from a mission trip to Oregon where he and about 60 other men built a log church. Yes, they actually felled the trees, notched them and made them live and breathe again thrugh worshipping the Lord.
    Since I'm one of those people who believes in recycling and turning something you would normally throw away into something useful, I was very much interested in seeing hundreds and hundreds of small bales of straw that were baled after wheat was cut. Those fields are normally burned off or plowed under, so somebody is being very innovative and making a few bucks at the same time. I'm not sure what they'll be used for...Carroll and I surmise probably landscaping mulch and/or grinding it to be mixed with other ingredients as ruffage in animal food.
    That's about it, again, from Tutwiler where we're all thankful for the recent rains. Thank YOU very much!

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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

    This past Saturday about 150 people gathered on the spacious, tree-lined lawn of Daisy Wolfe's home in Rena Lara for its Reunion, held every two years. They came from everywhere across the country and it took most of the day to get their reminiscing and catching up done. Some had not seen each other since childhood and it took a while in some instances to decide who was who but, observing from the sidelines, you could tell it was a happy time for everyone.
    People were trying to figure out who Carroll and I were and we tried to tell them "we used to live there" and, seeing their outdoor cooking going on, thought they would invite us to stay but they knew better. Actually, Daisy invited us since we were longtime friends and most of her children and grandchildren were going to be there, all of whom are our friends, too. Daisy's daughter Bettye Ousley was there with husband Ira from Henderson, Texas. Their son Dr. Bruce Ousley and two of his children were there from Houston, Texas. Bob and his family were unable to attend, as was Bill, but Stephanie and baby came. These are our dear friends who lived in Tutwiler all the time their children were growng up. Of course, Ira was born and raised in Tutwiler and managed the Tutwiler Bank for years and Bettye taught school. She also shared her beautiful voice on many, many occasions through the years. We have such happy memories of camping trips, boating and hiking with all of them including Daisy and her late husband Lloyd.
    Daisy's daughter Deenie, her daughter Brooke and Brooke's two children were there from Houston. Deenie's husband, son and son-in-law were hunting in Africa and Daisy's son David was there from Greenwood. Among the others, we knew some slightly, but most we met for the first time. Mr. Travis Jenkins who is in his eighties, said he was the oldest living original resident and he thought Daisy might be next. Some there were older but were not there from the beginning. I met a Mrs. Mitchell who said both sets of her children's grandparents lived to celebrate 70+ years together, (I figured that one out...didn't seem so simple at first) so her children "come from a long line of love" as the song says. Rep. Delma Furniss was there as well as the grandparents of Trace Furniss, who is a good friend of our grandson Sebe.
    On a smaller scale (in numbers only) was the gathering of "Bruisters" at Sam and Jerry Orman's on the 28th when Greg, Beth and Claire Bennett from Fort Worth came to visit. Greg is the grandson of the late Irene Bruister Bennett Hill and he always wants as many as can to come together for fun, fellowship and to experience a tightening of the ties that bind us together. Three year old Claire was not yet born when they last visited and on their next visit, we'll meet the one on the way now. The Saturday before, the Ormans attended Oakley Summer's wedding in Amory. Oakley is the son of David and Elizabeth Summer who served as Music Director for First Baptist Church in Tutwiler when Oakley was a little boy.
    Anne Barnes had her three 8 year old grandsons last week. They attended Lakeside Day Camp each day. Joel and James are twin sons of Joy and Jake Bellapanni of Belzoni and Allen is the son of Joann and Joseph Crews of Cleveland. They had a wonderful time at grandma's house. Earline Burton had her sons Barry, Rodney and Gregg for dinner last week. That's a rarity except at Christmas. Savannah Kellum got to wanting a good bath so she went to Hot Springs and got one...several, I think. Georgianna Smith visited Bobbie Rodgers in Memphis recently. Bobbie has been hospitalized for a month or more after sustaining severe injuries in an automobile accident.
    Pastor J.B. Hays visited Sammy Gee in Baptist Central and Edward Johnson of Cagle's Crossing in Baptist East on Wednesday. Bouldin Marley of Sumner had surgery in the Clarksdale Medical Center since our last column.
    Among those attending Jacqueline Reeves funeral were her cousins Frank Reid Chamblin and wife of St. Louis and Joan Chamblin Sallis of Florida. Both grew up in Sumner. Also, Dr. Dan Callicutt came from New Albany and the former Barbara Atkinson Baker was home visiting family and friends and attended the services. Sympathy goes to the Halfacre family in the death of Marvin Halfacre and to the Houston family in the death of Mrs. Alpha Houston.
    Barbara and Jimbo Dunavent attended ceremonies in South Carolina for their son Caleb's completion of Basic Training in the National Guard. He returned with them and will be attending Northwest this fall.
    Fifth Sunday night Hymn Sing was hosted by Sumner Baptist Church last Sunday. We didn't get there but were told by many that we missed a blessing. There are so many good voices in all our churches and I know it was great.
    Thelma Wright's house will be filled this weekend for the wedding of her grandson Jason to Helen Womble on Saturday at Tutwiler Baptist Church.
    Congratulations to Stan Bright and Faye Wise who were married recently. They divide their time between Sumner and her home at Enid Lake.
    That's about it, again, from Tutwiler where Librarian Judy Fillyaw wants everybody to be aware of activities at the Library like Story Hour on Wednesdays at 1 o'clock and Movie Hour at 1:00 on Thursdays. She has started a Recipe Club for anybody who wishes to participate and has new books in, as well. Make it a habit to visit the library and take advantage of all the good opportunities it offers.

News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

    Celebrations have abounded lately in our little town with much preparation and excitement going on.
    On Saturday, the 5th of August, Tutwiler Baptist Church was the setting for the wedding of Helen Womble and Jason Wright. Jason is the grandson of Thelma Wright whose home was filled for the happy occasion with her children Ferny and Barbara Wood and their children and spouses from Athens, Alabama. Their son Casey served as one of the ushers. It was a beautiful wedding, as was the reception which followed in the Everett Fellowship Hall of the church.
    On Sunday the 13th, the same Fellowship Hall was filled with friends and family celebrating Jean and Charles Thomas' 50th Wedding Anniversary. Their children Marsha Miller, Sandy Martin, Charlie Thomas, John Thomas and their families hosted this happy occasion with punch and cake served by the pretty grandaughters, singing by Gina Pearson and background music by Rose Hays, Anna Hays and Holly Pearson.
    On the same day and at the same time, the Lane family were making merry at their annual family gathering held in the Woman's Club building now belonging to the Lion's Club. They came from all over the U.S., with more than fifty in attendance.
    There will be another celebration Saturday at the Sumner Baptist Church when friends and family gather to help Evelyn and James Walters of Webb celebrate their 50th Anniversary. Congratulations to all of you.
    Schools are starting everywhere. Congratulations to Julye Clark, daughter of Bryce and Toni Clark of Sumner, who will be attending Mississippi School of Math and Science this year. We also congratulate Lauranne Vance, grandaughter of Barbara Jennings of Tutwiler and Maude Vance of Webb, for being selected as a Delta Belle at Delta State this year. Her mother, Luanne Vance, just returned from a business trip to New York in time fr the Bridal Shower she and Barbara hosted for bride-elect, Angie Ray, daughter of Katie and Doug Ray, formerly of near Tutwiler, but now living in Southaven.
    James and Annette Brand have returned from taking grandaughter Caitlin Johnson home to Houston, Texas after her summer visit. Their daughter Becky Wellman and husband Ed of Dunlap, Tennessee were visiting them this past week when Ed's grandmother died in Gillsburg, MS. After all of them attended the funeral, Becky came back to Tutwiler to finish her visit.
    Wayne and Carolyn McGraw no sooner got settled back in Tutwiler before making another move...this time to California. Joe and Anne Carter of Greenville, Indiana and Rachel Everett of Memphis were in town briefly last week, dropping by Savannah Kellums after visiting Lynne Everett at River Oaks in Clarksdale and Becky Brett of Vance and making a stop by the cemetery. (Cousin) Tommy Browning, his wife and two children of Louisiana visited Nelson and Jimmie Browning for several days this past week and a day or so later, their friend and former Tutwiler resident Virginia Wiliams of Pascagoula visited.
    A group of TNT Members from Tutwiler Baptist Church enjoyed food, fellowship and entertainment at Paynes Baptist Church on Thursday with the Tallahatchie Baptist Assoc. Merrymakers for their monthly get together.
    Daysidel Bruister-Berryhill brought brochures back to us from her two week trip through the Carolina's, Virginia and Kentucky. They sure are inviting and we hope we do more than just look at them.
    Gwen and Dayla Grissom have been spending as much time as possible with Gwen's sister D'lyla Daniels who is a patient at Baptist East in Memphis. D'lylah has been critical for several weeks but has now begun to show some improvement. Donna Drake remains hospitalized at St. Francis Hospital in Memphis. Agnes Martindale has been moved to the Flowers Wing swing-bed unit at NWMMC so she can get physical therapy after surgery from a broken pelvis. She is in good spirits and improving every day.
    We were saddened by the death of J.P. Robertson on August 4th. He suffered from Asbestos poisoning and died of a stroke at the young age of 46. J.P. and all of his brothers and sisters grew up in Tutwiler. Our sympathy goes to all of them.
    Another former Tutwiler "boy", Olaf Sessums of Zackery, La., died after a long battle with cancer. His sister Jane Dickerson and family live in Drew and we send our sympathies to them.
    When our grandaughters visited recently they couldn't believe we had never watched "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire" and invited us to watch with them. We did and were disappointed in how few questions we could answer. We found the most pressing question not to be "who wants to be a millionaire?" but who can answer the finger question fast enough to qualify! We've watched several times since then and, much to my surprise, were able to answer correctly two of these finger questions on last Tuesday's show. That made me feel a little less dumb and proved a "saying" I once read that "we're all ignorant in some things but we're not all ignorant of the same things" which is true. I learned something else from watching. Ginger ale is potable. Did you know that? I really did, too, just didn't know the word for it.
    I wager if you took a poll, most anybody from Tutwiler would answer affirmatively to the question, "Who wants to be a millionaire?". How about you?

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News from Tutwiler
by Janie Bruister

    We have a new dog. We didn't find her, she found us. We have no idea from whence she came or if anybody out there has a dog missing. If so, check with us, it might be yours. But hurry, we're bonding fast and already have a name picked out. We had a Lab pup to disappear from our yard once, never to be seen again and have had dogs to just show up and stay, without ever finding out who they belonged to. You can tell this one has been treated well...there's just no collar or means of identification and we figure somebody's looking.
    I'll pass a bit of advice on to you on another subject...don't get your drivers license renewed on a day when it's not your very best. Your photograph might send you into a state of shock, depression for sure. I've had days when my license photo flattered me, but I can truthfully say this one doesn't fall in that catagory. Mug shot is the best way to describe it. The camera zoomed in so close, my face looks unrecognizable even to me. My best friend said, "Umm, your eyes look just like two pee holes in the snow." I would certanly like to believe nobody could ever identify me by that thing. It makes my billfold sad to carry it around. Oh, well, maybe next time will be better. That's not but four years away!
    We were in Memphis Tuesday with Carroll having tests which would take some four hours, so I took note cards, since I needed to write a few people, plus the book I'm reading, thinking I'd get a lot of each done while I waited. A lady across the room asked me if I was from Clarksdale and when I said, "No, but real close by" she came over and sat by me where we chatted the entire time away. I couldn't believe it passed so quickly. She was such good friends with the doctor's secretary I just knew they were related but, "no, they had gotten to know each other through their visits." She was simply a good people person and I feel better from getting to know her, too. Her name is Jean Herndon and she lives in Clarksdale most of the time. The winter months, she and husband Layton spend in The Valley in Texas and enjoy Mexico at the same time.
    Baptist Pastor J.B. Hays and family have been vacationing and, during their absence, Michael Sumner who pastors a church at Lynn, MS. and layman Wayne Gore of Charleston filled the pulpit for him. During that time Patricia Pearson Cooper of Long Beach, California visited her mother Naida Pearson, her brother Keith, Fredna and extended family members as well as her home church, which is First Baptist, and was guest organist for the Sunday services. She is so talented and everybody enjoyed her performance.
    On the following Monday, her childhood friend and former Tutwiler resident Cecilia Box Harrell came from Jackson for the day. Patricia and "Ceil" were luncheon guests in Anne Barnes home and were to be joined by Donna Kimzey Drake who had to remain hospitalized for another day.
    Wayne Gore was Sunday dinner and afternoon guest of L.W. Kimzey before delivering the Sunday evening sermon.
    Funeral services for Sammy Gee, born in China but long time Tutwiler resident and owner of Silver Saver Grocery were held on Thursday the 23rd with burial at Lambert. It's traditional for the church family to provide meals for the bereaved family and close friends, which was held after the services later in the day with friends in the community contributing as well. Our sympathy and good wishes go to them all as well as to the family of I.D. Biggers, whose services were held Wednesday the 29th at Woodlawn Cemetary in Sumner. I always called I.D. "Doc" because he could mend small engines so well. He had moved to the Oakland area after having lived in Webb for many years.
    A few weeks ago our town began scraping the edges of the streets and picking up the grass and debris, making a great improvement in the looks of those areas. I keep looking and hoping it will continue over the whole town, for the cleaner it looks, the more inviting it is to visitors and potential residents. Not to mention how much better it makes all of us feel who see it every day.
    September will begin the new season of Sandwich With Books at the Library, meeting on the 4th Wednesday at noon. First review will be by Anne Starr. Reading! We recommend it.
    That's about it, again, from Tutwiler where the fields are growing whiter by the day. Soon the gins will be humming around the clock, serenading us through another harvest season.

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